Lexia Outside of the Classroom

Lexia supports flexible implementation strategies that extend learning beyond the classroom and school day. With Lexia, students can log in to their online reading program at any time and continue on their individualized learning paths via web browser, iPad, Chromebook, or desktop download. Because Lexia licenses allow customers to install the program on as many devices as necessary, schools can leverage available hardware resources at home or in community centers to ensure that every student receives the required minutes-per-week on Lexia.
 

Extended-Day Programs

Providing access to Lexia in your before- and after-school/extended-day program is an excellent way to ensure that students requiring additional time on the program are able to meet their usage goals. Using the real-time reports in myLexia.com, teachers and administrators will know which students require additional time in the program in order to progress towards year-end benchmarks and can prioritize those students for before- or after-school time blocks.  

This prescription of intensity of  instruction is critically important as it indicates the precise amount of time each student needs on the software in order to reach end-of-year benchmarks for grade-level proficiency. Access to Lexia outside of the classroom is beneficial not only for students needing additional time on the software in order to close the gap but also for those students striving to work above grade level.

 

Community Partnerships

Drawing upon community partners is an effective way to provide extended access to your students. Public libraries, Boys & Girls’ Clubs®, The YMCA, The United Way, and other community centers often provide computer access to children using Lexia, creating additional opportunities for students to advance their reading skills and close the gap.  
 

United Way of Santa Barbara County: 

A multi-year initiative led by the United Way of Santa Barbara County (UWSBC) surveyed thousands of Santa Barbara County residents and organizations regarding their ten-year goals for the community. “Education Improvement" was identified as the top priority, and as a result, UWSBC launched United for Literacy (UFL) — a countywide initiative focused on parent engagement, access to books, and online literacy programs (Lexia).

 
United Way Chattanooga: 

The Chattanooga Literacy Initiative is working together with Lexia to close the reading gap for students who have fallen behind. Lexia is available to children in many schools, community centers, non-profit programs, and churches throughout the city, thanks to United Way and various area partners.
 

Home Use

Students have the opportunity to access Lexia at home using their personal computers and tablets.

This school-to-home connection provides parents and other caregivers with a closer look into to the educational and literacy needs of their child, facilitating better communication between parents and classroom teachers during conferences.


 

 

 

Looking for specific product features?
Learn about Lexia Core5 Reading and how it can also support your students' outside of the classroom.

Learn more about Lexia Core5 Reading
 
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