Lexia supports Response to Intervention (RTI) and Multi-Tiered System of Supports (MTSS) models. The real-time, data-driven action plans that help teachers maximize their time by focusing attention where it is needed most by:

  • Identifying and grouping students for instruction based on risk of reading failure

  • Tracking the effectiveness of intervention with real-time diagnostic reports and trend lines

  • Prescribing instructional intensity needed to improve performance on grade-level assessments

watch the 6 areas of reading webinar

Who Lexia Helps

Students receiving Tier II and III instruction

With the accessibility of Lexia’s student data reports, the progress of students receiving Tier II and III instruction can be easily monitored by teachers, specialists, and paraprofessionals so each student receives the appropriate  targeted instruction.

For elementary students, Lexia provides a focused interface that supports executive functioning skills and promotes careful pacing to ensure mastery before progressing. For students requiring Tier II and III instruction, Lexia provides various levels of scaffolded support to allow more opportunities for independent learning.  If a student continuously struggles in the online program, an intervention specialist can pull the student out of the rotation and deliver Lexia’s adaptation version of the Lexia Lesson that addresses the skill with a different approach, rather than continuously repeating the same lesson.

For older students, Lexia was designed to support independent student learning via a more mature, age-appropriate interface—with content appropriate for their interest levels to keep unmotivated readers engaged—to develop their fundamental reading skills in a structured, sequential manner. 


How Lexia Helps

Lexia’s real-time reports identify the skills with which each student is struggling and provide the instructional groupings to support students with similar needs. Lexia offers structured, skill-specific instructional materials, called Lexia Lessons®, which provide step-by-step lessons following the Gradual Release of Responsibility model for a teacher or paraprofessional to address each student’s skill gap. These lessons can be delivered in the classroom rotation or in pull-out groups with intervention specialists. 


Data to track interventions
  • Identifies students for instruction

  • Assesses the effectiveness of interventions


Small-group instruction
  • Identifies and prioritizes students for small group instruction

  • Targets specific skills and sub-skills for additional practice and instruction

  • Provides the necessary resources for delivering instructional interventions

Communication across intervention teams
  • Shared access to student data

  • Data to help facilitate SST, PLC, and data team meetings

  • Decision making based on multiple data points

Celebrating success for intervention students
  • In-program progress monitoring and acknowledgment

  • Certificates of achievement

  • Communication tools for parents



See How Lexia Can Help Your Intervention Students
S. Y. Jackson Elementary School, Albuquerque Public School District, NM
Claude A. Wilcox Elementary School — Pocatello-Chubbuck District 25, ID
Chicago International Charter School (CICS) Irving Park, IL, A Distinctive Schools Campus
Research and Best Practices
How To Choose Educational Technology That Benefits English Language Learners
Monday, August 7, 2017
How To Choose Educational Technology That Benefits English Language Learners

New types of edtech are being developed all the time, bringing new opportunities to students around the country—and creating difficult choices for educators and administrators. With so many excellent products on the market, how can we possibly choose the right edtech resources for our students? Often, these difficult decisions come...

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Understanding Academic Language and its Connection to School Success
Understanding Academic Language and its Connection to School Success

In order to gain knowledge through independent reading and participate in meaningful discussions in the classroom, students must master the complex words and phrases that characterize the language of school. This paper discusses why proficiency in these skills, otherwise known as academic language, is critical for reading comprehension and overall academic success.

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From the Factory to Student-Centered Learning: A Look at Education Theory
Thursday, January 25, 2018
From the Factory to Student-Centered Learning: A Look at Education Theory

A frequent criticism of public education in the United States is its supposed resemblance to a factory. A 2012 article in The Atlantic went so far as to offer ways to “break free of our 19th-century factory-model education system.” The article, written by education and innovation entrepreneur Joel Rose, explored...

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Need to Improve Adolescent Literacy Rates? Develop a Literacy Action Plan
Friday, December 15, 2017
Need to Improve Adolescent Literacy Rates? Develop a Literacy Action Plan

In a 2011 paper prepared for the United States Department of Education, American Institutes for Research fellow Terry Salinger made a stark declaration: The literacy skills of many students in grades 4 to 12 are "so alarmingly low" that these students will struggle with not only high school, but also...

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Lexia Debuts New PowerUp Literacy Program, Enhancing Core English Language Arts Instruction for Non-Proficient Readers in Grades Six and Above

BOSTON (Jan. 17, 2018) – The National Center for Education Statistics has found that approximately two-thirds of eighth-grade students in the United States cannot read proficiently; that percentage has held relatively steady for 25 years. To help schools and districts close the achievement gap for non-proficient readers in grades six and above, Lexia Learning, a Rosetta Stone Inc. (NYSE: RST) Company, has released Lexia PowerUp Literacy™. The new program is designed to simultaneously accelerate the development of both fundamental literacy skills and higher-order thinking skills through adaptive learning paths.

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