Personalized Learning

Educators are expected to differentiate and adapt instruction for every student in their classroom but often lack the necessary time and resources to be successful. Incorporating a blended learning program with Lexia alleviates these problems by helping educators use technology to personalize learning for every student. With Lexia, educators can access both periodic screening and diagnostic data, real-time progress monitoring data, as well as the resources needed to connect student performance data to classroom instruction.
 

  • Identify instructional groups and tiers of instruction
     

  • Prioritize students at the greatest risk of reading failure
     

  • Support independent student learning with scaffolded support

 watch the BLENDED LEARNING webinar

 

 

How Lexia Helps

Adaptive, Personalized Learning for All Students

With Lexia, each student controls the pace and path of their learning.  When they first log in, students are placed automatically at the proper level based on their performance and work independently on developing their fundamental reading skills in targeted activities based on individual needs.  Lexia provides explicit, systematic, adaptive learning, scaffolding instruction for students as they struggle and advancing them to higher levels as they demonstrate proficiency.  


Data-Driven Instruction Predicts and Prescribes

Using Lexia’s real-time student data reports, educators can easily identify the students who are struggling and the specific skills they need to address. This helps teachers quickly prioritize and identify tiers of instruction and instructional groups without sifting through pages of data. Lexia's data reports also help teachers predict their students’ risk of reading failure and provides each student’s percent chance of reaching end-of-year benchmarks.  Color-coded icons signify risk level in order to visually help educators to quickly assess and compare the risk of reading failure associated with their students, classes, schools, or district. Based on this data, Lexia provides educators with a “Prescription of Intensity”—recommended levels of instructional intensity for each student—designed to improve each student's chance of reaching end-of-year benchmarks.  
 

On-Target and Advanced Students

Advanced students have the opportunity to accelerate beyond their grade level skills, as they are given the ability to demonstrate proficiency in each skill area, and are advanced to the next level in the program if no instruction is needed. When a student successfully completes a skill, Lexia provides a set of paper-and-pencil activities, called Lexia Skill Builders, for independent work or activities in peer groups. These activities are designed to build automaticity that has been mastered in the online activities and expand students’ expressive skills through discussions and written responses. These extension activities also provide flexibility for teachers; while some struggling students are pulled aside for direction instruction, on-target and advanced students can continue to work independently.
 

Struggling Students
If a student struggles in a particular Lexia activity, the program provides a level of scaffolding, removing some of the answer choices and stimuli on the screen. Once the student demonstrates that they understand the skill, they have the opportunity to try the activity again. If the student continues to struggle, Lexia provides explicit instruction on the concepts and rules of the skill, allowing the student to demonstrate proficiency and then return to the standard activities. For each particular skill students are struggling with, Lexia offers structured, skill-specific instructional materials, called Lexia Lessons, which provide step-by-step lessons following the Gradual Release of Responsibility model for a teacher or paraprofessional to address the student’s specific skill gap.
 

 

See How Lexia Supports Personalized Learning
Sterling Intermediate School, WA
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