Personalized Learning

Educators are expected to differentiate and adapt instruction for every student in their classroom but often lack the necessary time and resources to be successful. Incorporating a blended learning program with Lexia alleviates these problems by helping educators use technology to personalize learning for every student. With Lexia, educators can access both periodic screening and diagnostic data, real-time progress monitoring data, as well as the resources needed to connect student performance data to classroom instruction.
 

  • Identify instructional groups and tiers of instruction
     

  • Prioritize students at the greatest risk of reading failure
     

  • Support independent student learning with scaffolded support

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How Lexia Helps

Adaptive, Personalized Learning for All Students

With Lexia, each student controls the pace and path of their learning.  When they first log in, students are placed automatically at the proper level based on their performance and work independently on developing their fundamental reading skills in targeted activities based on individual needs.  Lexia provides explicit, systematic, adaptive learning, scaffolding instruction for students as they struggle and advancing them to higher levels as they demonstrate proficiency.  


Data-Driven Instruction Predicts and Prescribes

Using Lexia’s real-time student data reports, educators can easily identify the students who are struggling and the specific skills they need to address. This helps teachers quickly prioritize and identify tiers of instruction and instructional groups without sifting through pages of data. Lexia's data reports also help teachers predict their students’ risk of reading failure and provides each student’s percent chance of reaching end-of-year benchmarks.  Color-coded icons signify risk level in order to visually help educators to quickly assess and compare the risk of reading failure associated with their students, classes, schools, or district. Based on this data, Lexia provides educators with a “Prescription of Intensity”—recommended levels of instructional intensity for each student—designed to improve each student's chance of reaching end-of-year benchmarks.  
 

On-Target and Advanced Students

Advanced students have the opportunity to accelerate beyond their grade level skills, as they are given the ability to demonstrate proficiency in each skill area, and are advanced to the next level in the program if no instruction is needed. When a student successfully completes a skill, Lexia provides a set of paper-and-pencil activities, called Lexia Skill Builders, for independent work or activities in peer groups. These activities are designed to build automaticity that has been mastered in the online activities and expand students’ expressive skills through discussions and written responses. These extension activities also provide flexibility for teachers; while some struggling students are pulled aside for direction instruction, on-target and advanced students can continue to work independently.
 

Struggling Students
If a student struggles in a particular Lexia activity, the program provides a level of scaffolding, removing some of the answer choices and stimuli on the screen. Once the student demonstrates that they understand the skill, they have the opportunity to try the activity again. If the student continues to struggle, Lexia provides explicit instruction on the concepts and rules of the skill, allowing the student to demonstrate proficiency and then return to the standard activities. For each particular skill students are struggling with, Lexia offers structured, skill-specific instructional materials, called Lexia Lessons, which provide step-by-step lessons following the Gradual Release of Responsibility model for a teacher or paraprofessional to address the student’s specific skill gap.
 

 

See How Lexia Supports Personalized Learning
Woburn Public School District, MA
“Following our district’s new strategic plan, Lexia is a tool that is creating equity amongst our schools while providing students with opportunities and support we have not...
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Sterling Intermediate School, WA
Students at Sterling Intermediate are experiencing impressive growth as a result of using Core5. Because parents have access to the program at home, in a school where incoming...
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Research and Best Practices
Signal Words: 5 Fun Ways to Explain these Sentence Superheroes!
Signal Words: 5 Fun Ways to Explain these Sentence Superheroes!

All words are powerful, but some words have superpowers. Consider words and phrases that indicate relationships between ideas, like also, however, as a result, in addition, for example, and in contrast. These are signal words, and they are sentence superheroes. The ability to identify and understand the meaning of signal...

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Boosting ELL Achievement, State by State
Boosting ELL Achievement, State by State

Many literacy educators are concerned about meeting the diverse needs of English language learners (ELLs), and rightly so. Using dual-language education programs, educational technology, and in-class instructional support, educators have made strides in helping students learn and master the English language...

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English Learners and Dyslexia: A Guide

There are students who are English Learners (ELs), there are students who have dyslexia... and there are also ELs who have dyslexia. In a video presentation on the subject of EL students who may also have dyslexia, Dr. Fumiko Hoeft of the University of California, San Francisco discussed the difficulty...

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Mirrors and Doors: The Value of Choosing Diverse Books for Students
Mirrors and Doors: The Value of Choosing Diverse Books

The title of a post from the curriculum and teacher resource site Teaching Tolerance does not beat around the bush: “We Still Need Diverse Books.” Written by third-grade teacher Noelle Walters, the post tackles the enduring, stubbornly relevant topic of the need to make classroom literature choices that are both...

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