Growth Mindset

Students who possess a growth mindset are more motivated to learn and take on more challenges compared to students with fixed mindsets (Blackwell, Trzesniewski, & Dweck, 2007). When teachers have classes of more than 20 students with varied skill sets, though, helping each child develop a growth mindset can seem overwhelming without the right support tools. Lexia can help bridge this gap by providing students with:

  • Choice over learning path and the opportunity to take learning risks 
     

  • The ability to track their own progress toward individualized learning goals
     

  • Continuous feedback on ongoing effort with scaffolded support

watch the 3rd grade reading webinar

 

Who Lexia Helps

Students

Lexia helps students of all abilities develop a growth mindset. With Lexia, students participate in decision-making, engage with meaningful and challenging tasks differentiated for their skill level, and work at their own pace. With every click, Lexia collects important student performance data that can be used as a discussion point between the student and teacher to further support goal setting and progress monitoring.  
 

Teachers 

Lexia provides real-time, actionable data that helps educators prioritize students by who has the greatest need. Lexia alerts the teacher when students continuously struggle, so while on-target and advanced students work independently and continue to challenge themselves with new activities, the teacher can work directly with students who are struggling in a targeted fashion to help them apply alternative strategies to the concept.

 

How Lexia Helps

Personalized material challenges and engages students

Lexia allows students to first challenge themselves and demonstrate what they know about a concept, and then receive instruction to fill in the gaps. These meaningful learning tasks challenge all students, including advanced students who are ahead of their peers. 

 

Choice over learning path and opportunities to take learning risks 

Lexia lets students set their own pace, monitor progress, and choose activities from a curated list at the appropriate difficulty level. This helps students take greater risks in their learning and persist more on challenging activities. Program data helps educators identify those who may need extra support in taking risks on more difficult tasks. 

 

Continuous feedback on ongoing effort

Lexia provides continuous feedback for students through progress-monitoring features like the progress bar and animations at the completion of a task that acknowledge a student’s effort. Giving students immediate, real-time reinforcement after persisting through challenging work is especially important in supporting a growth mindset. 

 

Ability to track their own progress

Lexia helps students understand their progress and take ownership as they move through the scope and sequence. Achievement certificates highlight newly mastered skills using the “I can” statements. The student dashboard lets students see a visual representation of their journey through the 18 levels of the program, which helps build competence and reinforce that knowledge is gained through effort. 

 

Continuous opportunities for individualized practice with scaffolded support

Lexia helps students face challenges scaffolded to their own skill level with a visual interface that adapts based on student performance. When students continuously struggle, the program alerts the teacher who can then work directly with these students in a targeted fashion to help them apply alternative strategies to the concept. 

 

School-to-home connections and support for collaboration in the classroom

Lexia helps students share their progress on tasks, celebrate each other’s successes, or be peer mentors for one another. Data reports can also be sent home with a student to inform a parent of how hard the student is working and remind the parent to support a growth perspective at home  

 
See How Lexia Can Support Growth Mindset Development
Research and Best Practices
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