Lexia PowerUp Literacy

Lexia PowerUp Literacy™ is designed to help students in grades 6 and above become proficient readers and confident learners. PowerUp helps educators simultaneously address gaps in fundamental literacy skills while helping students build the higher-order skills they need to comprehend, analyze, evaluate, and compare increasingly complex literary and informational texts. Blending online student-driven explicit instruction with offline teacher-delivered lessons and activities, Lexia PowerUp empowers secondary teachers—regardless of their background or expertise in reading—to deliver the exact instruction each student needs to become a proficient reader. With PowerUp, you will be able to:
 

  • Address the instructional needs of a wide range of reader profiles

  • Engage, challenge, and motivate students to take ownership of their learning

  • Help students develop the skills they need to succeed in content-area classes
     
 PowerUp Video Demo

 

Lexia PowerUp Literacy Supports

Educators are Talking About PowerUp

Educators are Talking About PowerUp

"Because we chose to screen all of our students with RAPID, not just those students we felt needed support, we discovered that our entire middle school population lacked proficiency in grammar, one of the three instructional strands addressed by PowerUp. Knowing this, we have all our students use PowerUp to close these skill gaps."

—  Nancy Talley, Director of Curriculum, River Valley Local School District, Caledonia, OH

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PowerUp's Personalized Learning Model

PowerUp's Personalized Learning Model

Independent, Student-Driven Learning

Students have individualized learning paths and are motivated by their own success.

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Embedded Progress Monitoring

Teachers can see real-time student performance data that is easy to access and simple to interpret.

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Resources for Teacher-Led Instruction

Teachers have the resources they need to provide direct instruction and intervention.

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