Evidence-Based, Research-Proven: Measuring Lexia’s Impact

 

Evidence-Based, Research-Proven:
Measuring Lexia’s Impact




Lexia programs are proven to improve learning outcomes required by federal mandates under the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA). Lexia’s rigorous research portfolio of studies published over the past 15 years meets the highest levels of evidence under ESSA needed to evaluate instructional programs.

While the ESSA mandate is new, documenting the evidence of the effectiveness of our literacy solutions is not. Founded through a research grant over 30 years ago, Lexia has been committed to conducting evidence-based, scientific research to support the development of Lexia products and demonstrate the efficacy of Lexia programs. For the past 15 years, studies on Lexia products have been conducted and published by researchers around the world. Lexia now has 16 externally-reviewed research studies that meet the standards of evidence under ESSA: 8 strong, 2 moderate, and 6 promising.
 

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STRONG

Strong evidence is defined as well-designed, well-implemented experimental studies that include randomly assigned treatment and control groups to eliminate selection biases.

 

 Thumbnail Image of the British Journal of Education Psychology 2016
British Journal of Education Psychology (2016)
This 2016 study examined the role of an early‐intervention, computer‐based literacy program to boost phonological skills in 4‐ to 6‐year‐olds. 
 
Thumbnail Image of the Journal Cover of Computers in the Schools, Volume 32, Numbers 3-4, July-December 2015
Computers in the Schools (2015)
This 2015 study investigated the potential benefits of a blended learning approach on the reading skills of low socioeconomic status students in Grades 1 and 2.
 
Thumbnail Image of Reading Psychology An International Journal 2011
Reading Psychology (2011)
This 2011 study examined the efficacy of using computer-assisted instruction (CAI) to supplement a phonics-based reading curriculum for preschoolers in an urban public school system.
 
Thumbnail Image of Reading Psychology An International Journal 2008
Reading Psychology (2008)
This 2008 study examined the efficacy of using computer-assisted instruction (CAI) to supplement a phonics-based reading curriculum for kindergartners in an urban public school system.

MODERATE

Moderate evidence is defined as well-designed, well-implemented quasi-experimental studies with treatment and control groups that may not be randomly assigned. There may be some selection biases that are statistically addressed.

 

Thumbnail Image of Reading Psychology An International Journal 2011
Reading Psychology (2011)
This 2011 study examined the efficacy of using computer-assisted instruction to supplement a phonics-based reading curriculum for kindergartners in an urban public school system.
Journal of Research in Special Education Needs (2013)
This paper evaluates the impact of Lexia Reading software on the progress of children with reading difficulties in four Northern Ireland Schools.  
 

PROMISING

Promising studies include correlational evidence that the program has an impact. These studies may not include a control group, but selection effects are addressed statistically.

 

This paper examined the validity of using performance measures from a computer-based reading program gathered through embedded “Assessment Without Testing®” technology as indicators of reading ability. 
 
 

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