Lexia RAPID Assessment

Lexia® RAPID™ Assessment for grades K–12 helps teachers and educational leaders make decisions that promote reading success. This research-based, computer-adaptive reading and language assessment allows educators to gather predictive, norm-referenced data up to three times a year, with immediate scoring and reports. RAPID for Grades K–2 measures students’ foundational skills in the key reading and language domains of Word Recognition, Academic Language, and Reading Comprehension. RAPID for Grades 3–12 measures complex knowledge, understanding, and application of skills within these domains.

  • Administered one-on-one and in small groups for grades K–2, group-administered for grades 3–12

  • Student, class, school, and district reports available immediately on myLexia.com

  • Generates instructional groups and links to instructional resources

 PREVIEW RAPID REPORTS 

 

Why Lexia RAPID Assessment?

RAPID's Adaptive Assessment Model

RAPID's Adaptive Assessment Model

Screen Reading and Language Skills

With tasks that adapt based on individual, real-time performance, RAPID predicts students' likelihood of end-of-year success.

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Identify Instructional Needs

RAPID provides a skills profile for each student and connects teachers to instructional strategies to target students' needs.

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Measure Skill Development

Educators can determine whether students have made progress in the reading and language skills assessed by RAPID.

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Educators Are Talking About RAPID

Educators Are Talking About RAPID

"“Two students may be struggling with reading, but for very different reasons. RAPID is the only screener that helps us easily identify where a student is struggling."

— Ashley Leneway, Technology & Curriculum Integration Specialist, Morgen Owings Elementary School, Lake Chelan School District, Washington
 

Read the Case Study

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