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Preparing for the Ultimate EdTech Conference: 5 Tips for Attending ISTE 2019
Monday, May 20, 2019
Preparing for the Ultimate EdTech Conference: 5 Tips for Attending ISTE 2019

What’s next in the world of educational technology? For educators, administrators, and education stakeholders, there’s one place to find out: the International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE) conference. The ISTE is a nonprofit organization committed to working with the global education community to spark innovative uses for technology in...

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Do You See Me? Applying an Equity Lens to Literacy Instruction
Friday, May 17, 2019
Do You See Me? Applying an Equity Lens to Literacy Instruction

Classrooms across the United States are changing rapidly. Today more than ever, teachers are likely to encounter students whose native language, race, or socioeconomic status differs from their own. Indeed, according to a 2017 Atlanta Journal-Constitution piece by education policy writer Maureen Downey that touched on the changing demographics in...

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Details, Please! Exploring the Benefits of Mastery-Based Learning
Tuesday, May 14, 2019
Details, Please! Exploring the Benefits of Mastery-Based Learning

Mastery-based learning is a growing area of interest for many educators. A 2019 post on the Hechinger Report website documents both the challenge and the potential associated with this approach to learning, which seeks to assess students’ knowledge and skill levels as they move through various concepts and tasks. Written...

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Playful Assessments: Injecting Fun into Measuring Outcomes
Thursday, May 9, 2019
Playful Assessments: Injecting Fun into Measuring Outcomes

Assessing students with standardized testing is a given in public schools throughout the United States—especially in the wake of 2001’s federal No Child Left Behind law, which mandated that all students in grades three through eight be tested annually in reading and math, while older students should be periodically...

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Is Universal Design for Learning the Path to Success for All?
Wednesday, May 1, 2019
Is Universal Design for Learning the Path to Success for All?

Universal design is a concept first articulated by Ronald Mace, who worked as a North Carolina architect at a time when conventional building design was being challenged by a growing awareness of the rights and needs of people with disabilities. In 1989, Mace founded the Center for Universal Design at...

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Twitter 101: Do's and Don'ts of Sharing Classroom Information Online
Thursday, April 25, 2019
Twitter 101: Do's and Don'ts of Sharing Classroom Information Online

Where do educators go for teaching tips, ideas, and advice? In the digital age, social media has emerged as a surprisingly effective avenue for educators to connect with each other and learn more about their craft. In particular, Twitter allows educators to ask each other quick questions and receive almost...

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Playful Assessments: 3 Ways to Inject Fun into Measuring Outcomes
Friday, April 19, 2019
Playful Assessments: 3 Ways to Inject Fun into Measuring Outcomes

Assessing students with standardized testing is a given in public schools throughout the United States—especially in the wake of 2001’s federal No Child Left Behind law, which mandated that all students in grades three through eight be tested annually in reading and math, while older students should be periodically tested...

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Mirrors and Doors: The Value of Choosing Diverse Books for Students
Wednesday, April 17, 2019
Mirrors and Doors: The Value of Choosing Diverse Books

The title of a post from the curriculum and teacher resource site Teaching Tolerance does not beat around the bush: “We Still Need Diverse Books.” Written by third-grade teacher Noelle Walters, the post tackles the enduring, stubbornly relevant topic of the need to make classroom literature choices that are both...

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Beyond the Reading Wars: Embracing the Science of Learning
Thursday, April 11, 2019
Beyond the Reading Wars: Embracing the Science of Learning

The so-called reading wars flared up again recently when reporter Emily Hanford released a radio documentary series about reading instruction through American Public Media. In a 2018 “Hard Words” episode, Hanford dived directly into the conflict at the heart of the reading instruction wars: Is it best to use phonics-based...

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