Blended Learning

Educators are expected to differentiate and adapt instruction for every student in their classroom but often lack the necessary time and resources to be successful. Incorporating a blended learning program with Lexia alleviates these problems by helping educators use technology to individualize content delivery and streamline instruction by providing educators with both periodic screening and diagnostic data, on-going, real-time progress monitoring data, as well as the resources needed to connect performance data to classroom instruction.

  • Simple-to-interpret progress monitoring data
     

  • Resources to connect student performance data to classroom instruction
     

  • Flexible implementation scenarios

Who Lexia Helps

Students

In the classroom, students work independently online to develop their fundamental reading skills on desktop computers, iPads, and Chromebooks. As students work in the program, Lexia gathers real-time student performance data without stopping instruction to administer a test.  This gives students control over where and how they develop fundamental reading skills and teachers don’t have to interrupt instruction to administer a test. 
 

Teachers and Administrators

Whether educators need daily, weekly, or monthly assessment data, Lexia products provide access to simple, real-time reports that serve as data-driven action plans.  Action plans indicate who is struggling and where they need specific instruction, prioritizing students at the greatest risk of reading failure. Based on this data, teachers are provided with targeted instructional and practice materials.

 

How Lexia Helps

Differentiates Instruction for Students at Various Skill Levels

Blended learning enhances education in a way that traditional classrooms cannot. Instead of a one-size-fits-all approach, using Lexia's adaptive learning technologies in a blended model enables students to master new concepts at their own pace and provides teachers the data and instructional resources to give struggling students the individualized attention that they need. 
 

Connects Student Data to Classroom Instruction

A successful blended learning program includes the collection of data and recommends next steps for the teacher. Using Lexia's easy-to-access and simple-to interpret student data reports, teachers can identify the areas in which students excel or struggle, helping teachers with instructional prioritization and strengthening interventions. 
 

Gives Students More Time to Learn

With the use of mobile technology (laptops, Chromebooks, tablets) and computer labs, learning can be expanded outside of the classroom in before- and after-school programs. Because Lexia licenses allow customers to install the program on as many devices as necessary, schools can leverage available hardware resources at home, at school, or in community centers to give students more time to learn.
 

Provides Classroom Flexibility 

Blended learning with Lexia provides additional support for teachers so they can work with small groups of struggling students while other students work independently on skill development or automaticity. Technology will never replace a teacher, but it can provide much-needed flexibility for a single teacher to support a class with a wide range of abilities. 
 

Helps Students Meet Digital Literacy Requirements

Digital literacy is now at the center of the Common Core State Standards. Using Lexia products in a blended learning environment is an effective way to introduce students to technology and prepare them for success in a digital world. 
 

Implementation Models

Elementary

In an elementary blended learning classroom, Lexia is most commonly implemented in the classroom rotation, computer lab rotation, and 1:1 device blended learning models. The benefits of flexible, independent student learning on an adaptive platform allow each student to work at his or her own pace in a variety of settings. While some students receive direct instruction from the teacher using Lexia Lessons, other students can practice skills using Lexia Skill Builders. Students can also work collaboratively to reinforce concepts using activity ideas from Lexia Instructional Connections.  The power behind Lexia products is a focus on the rigor of the provided content and data while being seamlessly integrated into a variety of learning environments.

Classroom rotation composite Computer lab rotation 1 to 1 composite

Classroom Center Rotation                          Computer Lab/Classroom Hybrid                                        1:1 Device

 
Secondary

Starting in middle school, the emphasis for literacy instruction shifts from explicitly teaching fundamental reading skills to teaching students to think critically about the texts they read. ELA teachers in grades 6–12 may use a basal ELA curriculum program, literature anthology, or other selection of grade-level-appropriate texts to teach students how to engage with and think critically about literary and informational texts. In other content areas (mathematics, science, and social studies), students are expected to read, interpret, and analyze informational texts. Schools and districts may provide additional instruction to non-proficient readers to address gaps in fundamental literacy skills in a number of ways.

 

See How Lexia Can Help Your Blended Learning Classroom
Claude A. Wilcox Elementary School — Pocatello-Chubbuck District 25, ID
Chicago International Charter School (CICS) Irving Park, IL, A Distinctive Schools Campus
Mary Walter Elementary School — Fauquier County School District, VA
Research and Best Practices
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