Multi-Tier Classroom Setting

In elementary multi-tier classrooms, students' skill levels can vary greatly. In order for educators to personalize and adapt instruction for every student in their classroom, they need the necessary tools to individualize content delivery and the actionable data to help differentiate their approach. Lexia’s literacy assessment and literacy improvement solutions help streamline instruction by providing educators with both periodic screening and diagnostic data, on-going, real-time progress monitoring data, as well as the resources needed to connect performance data to classroom instruction.
 

  • Identifies instructional groups and tiers of instruction
     

  • Prioritizes students at the greatest risk of reading failure
     

  • Supports independent student learning, notifying teachers only when students struggle

How Lexia Helps

Adaptive, Personalized Learning for All Students

With Lexia, each student controls the pace and path of their learning.  When they first log in, students are placed automatically at the proper level based on their performance and work independently on developing their fundamental reading skills in targeted activities based on individual needs.  Lexia provides explicit, systematic, adaptive learning, scaffolding instruction for students as they struggle and advancing them to higher levels as they demonstrate proficiency.  


Data-Driven Instruction Predicts and Prescribes

Using Lexia’s real-time student data reports, educators can easily identify the students who are struggling and the specific skills they need to address. This helps teachers quickly prioritize and identify tiers of instruction and instructional groups without sifting through pages of data. Lexia's data reports also help teachers predict their students’ risk of reading failure and provides each student’s percent chance of reaching end-of-year benchmarks.  Color-coded icons signify risk level in order to visually help educators to quickly assess and compare the risk of reading failure associated with their students, classes, schools, or district. Based on this data, Lexia provides educators with a “Prescription of Intensity”—recommended levels of instructional intensity for each student—designed to improve each student's chance of reaching end-of-year benchmarks.  
 

On-Target and Advanced Students

Advanced students have the opportunity to accelerate beyond their grade level skills, as they are given the ability to demonstrate proficiency in each skill area, and are advanced to the next level in the program if no instruction is needed. When a student successfully completes a skill, Lexia provides a set of paper-and-pencil activities, called Lexia Skill Builders, for independent work or activities in peer groups. These activities are designed to build automaticity that has been mastered in the online activities and expand students’ expressive skills through discussions and written responses. These extension activities also provide flexibility for teachers; while some struggling students are pulled aside for direction instruction, on-target and advanced students can continue to work independently.
 

Struggling Students
If a student struggles in a particular Lexia activity, the program provides a level of scaffolding, removing some of the answer choices and stimuli on the screen. Once the student demonstrates that they understand the skill, they have the opportunity to try the activity again. If the student continues to struggle, Lexia provides explicit instruction on the concepts and rules of the skill, allowing the student to demonstrate proficiency and then return to the standard activities. For each particular skill students are struggling with, Lexia offers structured, skill-specific instructional materials, called Lexia Lessons, which provide step-by-step lessons following the Gradual Release of Responsibility model for a teacher or paraprofessional to address the student’s specific skill gap.
 

See How Lexia Can Help Your Multi-Tier Classroom
Morgen Owings Elementary School — Lake Chelan School District, WA
Research and Best Practices
Loving Lexia

I have several students who entered third grade as struggling readers. They had little confidence and already seemed resigned to not being able to read. After doing Lexia for a couple of months, their confidence has bloomed, and they are reading up a storm!

 

Read More
Grit: An Essential Ingredient of Academic Success
Monday, March 6, 2017
Grit: An Essential Ingredient of Academic Success

An athlete who wins an Olympic medal. A cadet who passes basic training. A student who earns a high GPA. What do these people have in common? Talent or intelligence may have been the first answers to come to mind, but there’s another less conspicuous factor that runs strong in these individuals: grit....

Read More
Understanding Academic Language and its Connection to School Success
Understanding Academic Language and its Connection to School Success

In order to gain knowledge through independent reading and participate in meaningful discussions in the classroom, students must master the complex words and phrases that characterize the language of school. Proficiency in these skills, otherwise known as academic language, is critical for reading comprehension and overall academic success.

Read More
Structural Analysis

Structural analysis activities include work on recognizing meaningful parts of multisyllabic words derived from Latin and Greek. Morphological structure refers to the study of meaningful units of language or morphemes (e.g., prefix, root and suffix) 

Read More
Lexia Learning Releases White Paper on Choosing Educational Technology That Helps, Rather than Hinders, Students’ Intrinsic Motivation

BOSTON (March 16, 2017) – While student motivation in traditional classroom settings is well researched, materials on how digital tools are enhancing or undermining this essential factor for academic performance are harder to find. Lexia Learning, a Rosetta Stone Inc. (NYSE: RST) Company, has released a white paper titled, “The Importance of Intrinsic Student Motivation When Selecting Educational Technologies,” which not only focuses on well-researched methods of supporting students’ intrinsic motivation but also applies that research to educational technologies.

 

Read More
Technology Integration Guidance for Early Childhood Education
Tuesday, March 21, 2017
Technology Integration for Early Childhood Education

For today’s students, learning to use new technologies is a necessary life skill. As more of our business and personal lives take place online, it’s only natural that students must learn to use keyboards, touch screens, and other digital tools as part of their education. However, it is equally...

Read More